Who will win the Eurostory Best Lyrics Award 2022? – Eurostory

For the sixth time we reach that Eurostory Prize for best texts out – the prize for the best lyrics from the Eurovision Song Contest.

In previous years, the award was won by:

And the six nominees for 2022 are now known. Also this year, the winner will be chosen by a large international jury and by you who are visitors to this site. [update: inmiddels is de stemtermijn voorbij, we maken volgende week de winnaar bekend.]


Growing phenomenon
The Eurostory Best Lyrics Award is a growing phenomenon in the Eurovision world. In 2021, a few days before the victory of the final of the Eurovision Song Contest, the Italian group received the Moonlight Eurostory Award. Their song Zitti and buoni won both the international jury of experts and the public votes (40,000+ readers of the website). “This is very special,” singer and lyricist Damiano David said when he received the award. ‘For the first time in my life, I win an award for my lyrics. I’ll never forget this. ‘


Expert jury
In addition to the public votes, the winner of the Eurostory Best Lyrics Award will be nominated by a jury of international writers, journalists, publishers and former participants – people who work professionally with lyrics. They will also vote in the coming weeks, and in Eurovision week in Turin, the winner of Eurostory Best Lyrics Award 2022 will be announced.


The nominees
The nominees for the Eurostory Best Lyrics Award 2022 are in no particular order:

  • SwitzerlandBoys cry (Marius Bear, text: Marius Bear & Martin Galop)
  • SerbiaI corpore sano (Contract, text: Ana Đurić)
  • Ukraine – Stefania (Kalush Orchestra, lyrics: Ivan Klymenko & Oleh Psiuk)
  • The United KingdomRUMMANDEN (Sam Ryder, lyrics: Sam Ryder, Amy Wadge & Max Wolfgang)
  • ItalyBrividia (Mahmood & BLANCO, text: Alessandro Mahmoud & Riccardo Fabbriconi)
  • AustraliaNot the same (Sheldon Riley, text: Sheldon Riley Hernandez).

Below you will find the jury’s reports.


SwitzerlandBoys cry (Marius Bear, text: Marius Bear & Martin Galop)

jury report
Very slowly and very carefully, Marius Bjørn leads us into his song and his story. First with a positioning: ‘In my room.’ So with a character: ‘Lives a boy’. What happens to him then: ‘Who could be blue.’ He could be upset, standing there, making it clear that we should not be too quick to jump into entrenched ideas. Not all boys are always big, no, boys cry too. Nicely, this claim is accompanied by the undermining of other certainties: mountains can crumble, planes can fall from the sky. The creators score extra points with the beautiful word ‘cavalier’ (‘indifferent’).

Read more about Switzerland’s nomination for the Eurostory Best Lyrics Award 2022 here.


SerbiaI corpore sano (Contract, text: Ana Đurić)

jury report
Maybe the opening line of I corpore sano the most special of all Eurovision songs ever: ‘What could be the secret behind Megan Markle’s healthy hair?’ After a talk about hydration and bags under the eyes, follow the rules of… spleen. That body part has not been mentioned before in a Eurovision broadcast. The rest of the text is rather bizarre, but not incoherent: it builds a mindset that ultimately deals with the impracticable beauty and health requirements imposed on public figures. With a desperate last sentence: ‘What shall we do now?’

Read more about Serbia’s nomination for the Eurostory Best Lyrics Award 2022 here.


Ukraine – Stefania (Kalush Orchestra, lyrics: Ivan Klymenko & Oleh Psiuk)

jury report
Stefania has become a song that expresses the pain of the terrible war in Ukraine, but in a round way: It simply describes the love of all our mothers. Underneath that declaration of love lies an accusation of destroying what is of paramount importance, your family, your origin, your home, your country. Although the members of the Kalush Orchestra might not have known that their lyrics would weigh so much, a phrase like ‘Розквітає поле, а вона сивіє’ (‘The field is blooming but her hair is turning gray’) now feels like a painful metaphor. What you love most in the world, your mother, is also getting old. But it also says in the song, ‘My love for you has no end.’

Read more about Ukraine’s nomination for the Eurostory Best Lyrics Award 2022 here.


The United KingdomRUMMANDEN (Sam Ryder, lyrics: Sam Ryder, Amy Wadge & Max Wolfgang)

jury report
Do we think this song is about a space man? Wrong thinking. But it makes sense, because the copywriters do something very smart: They put a comma in between (and of course you do not hear that). So it’s ‘I’m up in the room, man!’ And ‘Nothing but space, man!’ The commas do RUMMANDEN one of the funniest songs of the year. But sadness is not avoided either, because the I-person imagines himself in space because he thinks he no longer suffers there from the broken heart that he suffers from on earth. Not that it helps: ‘gravity keeps pulling me down as long as you’re on the ground.’ In the last line, the main character chooses his actual destination (‘I wanna go home’) – a nice ending to a fine tragicomic text.

Read more about the UK’s nomination for the Eurostory Best Lyrics Award 2022 here.


ItalyBrividia (Mahmood & BLANCO, text: Alessandro Mahmoud & Riccardo Fabbriconi)

jury report
Of Brividia Mahmood and BLANCO created a narrative that is truly universal. Regardless of our gender or sexuality, we have all experienced painful cracks in our high hopes of love. The first sentence sparkles: ‘I dreamed of flying with you on a diamond bike.’ This metaphor is so new, but also so striking that it hangs over the entire song. And just as the diamond bike represents happiness, the opening words in the chorus ‘nudo con brividi’ – naked with horror – brilliantly convey how you feel when you discover that something is wrong. Also in the rest of the song, the creators deliver one amazing image after another, and even in the tail, ‘uno fra tanti’, one of many, they make another important plot twist.

Read more about Italy’s nomination for the Eurostory Best Lyrics Award 2022 here.


AustraliaNot the same (Sheldon Riley, text: Sheldon Riley Hernandez).

jury report
Riley explains in plain text how, as a child diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome, he constantly had to experience how different he was – ‘I’m not the same’. Instead of using literal emotion words (“angry”, “sorry”), he gives examples, which makes Riley’s testimony much stronger. A strong example is the phrase that his father asked him if he has laughed today. Also strong is the beautiful discovery with which Riley turns the song halfway through: ‘So you go and leave the pain and find another way to make yourself in another game, maybe one for everyone to play, because it’s not just me who is not the same – we ‘are not the same’.

Read more about Australia’s nomination for the Eurostory Best Lyrics Award 2022 here.


Vote now!
The winner will be chosen partly by an international professional jury, consisting of writers, journalists, songwriters and former participants (75%), AND partly by YOU, visitors to our website (25%). You can now (by 1 May) cast your vote via the poll at the top of this page. Just before the final of the Eurovision Song Contest in Turin, we announce the winner of Eurostory Best Lyrics Award 2022!


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