What is art? Getty Images Bans AI Works – News

Getty Images, one of the world’s largest online image banks, will ban AI-generated images. The site fears copyright infringement.

Getty Images CEO Craig Peters has informed the technology site The Verge about the ban. Getty Images is a large image bank that includes press photos, stock images and digital artwork used by media organizations worldwide. The company now bans the uploading of images generated by artificial intelligence. These are images made by AIs like Dall-E and Stable Diffusion.

The problem with those images, Peters says, is that it’s not clear what they’re based on or who owns the copyright. To protect customers from potential lawsuits, the images are simply prohibited. There will be an image review procedure and users will also be able to report images that they suspect are computer generated.

Dall-E

AI-generated images are on the rise now that there are several algorithms that are reasonably good at it. AIs like Dall-E and Stable Fusion allow users to generate images using text commands. You can do exciting things with it, as we saw at the recent Data News Awards.

However, AI-generated images are also controversial. The algorithm was trained on databases of existing photos and artwork. In addition, it is not always clear whether copyright-protected images have not ended up in that database. Furthermore, (US) law is far from clear whether an algorithm or the user behind the text commands would receive copyright when they created these images. This is the rights case that Getty Images is now trying to get ahead with its ban on the images, not least because the copyright is paid to the uploaders of the images. Shutterstock, Getty Images’ biggest competitor, currently still allows AI images.

What is art?

But there is also the whole question of what it means to make these works, which touch the wider art world. In early September, Jason Allen won an art competition in the US state of Colorado with a submitted work that he generated via AI. It provoked a flood of reactions, with criticism of the ‘death of the artist’, but also from human artists who feared for their future.

This means that not only commercial sites like Getty, but also various online artist communities enforce bans on AI-generated images. For example, the site Newgrounds imposed such a ban last week because “we want to maintain the focus on art made by people and because we do not want to flood the art portal with computer-generated art.”

Getty Images CEO Craig Peters has informed the technology site The Verge about the ban. Getty Images is a large image bank that includes press photos, stock images and digital artwork used by media organizations worldwide. The company now bans the uploading of images generated by artificial intelligence. These are images created by AIs like Dall-E and Stable Diffusion. The problem with these images, Peters says, is that it’s not clear what they’re based on or who owns the copyright. To protect customers from potential lawsuits, the images are simply prohibited. There will be an image review procedure and users will also be able to report images that they suspect are computer generated. AI-generated images are on the rise now that there are several algorithms that are reasonably good at it. AIs like Dall-E and Stable Fusion allow users to generate images using text commands. You can do exciting things with it, as we saw at the recent Data News Awards. However, AI-generated images are also controversial. The algorithm was trained on databases of existing photos and artwork. In addition, it is not always clear whether copyright-protected images have not ended up in that database. Furthermore, (US) law is far from clear whether an algorithm or the user behind the text commands would receive copyright when they created these images. This is the rights case that Getty Images is now trying to get ahead with its ban on the images, not least because the copyright is paid to the uploaders of the images. Shutterstock, Getty Images’ biggest competitor, currently still allows AI images. But there is also the whole question of what it means to make these works, which touch the wider art world. In early September, Jason Allen won an art competition in the US state of Colorado with a submitted work that he generated via AI. It provoked a flood of reactions, with criticism of the ‘death of the artist’, but also from human artists who feared for their future. This means that not only commercial sites like Getty, but also various online artist communities enforce bans on AI-generated images. For example, the site Newgrounds imposed such a ban last week because “we want to maintain the focus on art made by people and because we do not want to flood the art portal with computer-generated art.”

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