Bosch and IBM jointly look for quantum computing applications – News

Bosch and IBM will collaborate on quantum computing. This is still very early research, but both companies see value in IBM’s expertise in the technology and the simulations and applications in which Bosch is active.

‘It’s a long shot’, Bosch chairman Stefan Hartung immediately admits, ‘but once it’s there, this will be a multi-billion dollar business.’ IBM has been communicating its quantum computing efforts for some time now, Bosch is now the party that has practical applications for it.

‘We are two different companies: IBM with its hardware and research, and Bosch looking for specific solutions in targeted areas for our future. But it is still early days, a quantum computer occupies a space today, it is not yet in your pocket’, Hartung puts into perspective.

The German industrial giant sees opportunities for the future: ‘We must consume less energy, use hydrogen optimally, but also develop better motors with magnets. These magnets are made of rare metals. We hope to be able to use quantum computers to create simulations that teach us to need less of these raw materials, or to replace them with other substances and thus make our own products better and more affordable,’ explains Thomas Kropf, head of corporate R&D at Bosch.

Another example can be found in Alzheimer’s research. Detecting brain waves in the most granular way can help research the state of the brain, but to do that you need devices with magnets that are as fine and efficient as possible. It’s all still a long way off, but the ambitions are there. Bosch remains its sober self in this: very ambitious and focused, but without claiming that the recently announced collaboration already has ready-made solutions.

‘Still big steps to take’

The reason for looking at quantum computing is that classical (super)computers are at their limits. But at the same time, Bosch also dampens expectations: It is research with concrete goals, but actual applications are still a long way off. “There are still big steps to be taken, but we want to step in now because the world is on the brink of major breakthroughs, and once there, quantum computers will change our lives in every way. Hopefully in our generation , but definitely in the next one.’

But isn’t Bosch just an IBM customer rather than a partner? The company strongly contradicts this. ‘IBM does not do material simulations. We know how to do simulations and how to improve products based on these results, IBM knows how to build computers,’ explains Hartung to Data News.

“It’s more than being an IBM customer,” adds Kropf. ‘We are building a common ecosystem: we are programming a quantum computer in a different way, we are looking at hardware optimizations, how to go from code to compilation. All things that are still far from mature’.

Bosch does not disclose how much money will go towards the collaboration with IBM. But it emphasizes that it is not the main focus either. Kropf: ‘We especially want to bring together the best people from both companies to achieve something phenomenal. We will not just build ten quantum computers, but in the longer term we will build quantum sensors, for example.’ “It’s not just putting money on the table, others are already doing it,” adds Hartung delicately.

‘It’s a long shot’, Bosch chairman Stefan Hartung immediately admits, ‘but once it’s there, this will be a multi-billion dollar business.’ IBM has been communicating its quantum computing efforts for some time now, Bosch is now the party that has practical applications for it. ‘We are two different companies: IBM with its hardware and research, and Bosch looking for specific solutions in targeted areas for our future. But it is still early days, a quantum computer occupies a room today, it is not yet in your pocket,’ Hartung puts it into perspective. These magnets are made of rare metals. We hope to be able to use quantum computers to create simulations that teach us to need less of these raw materials, or to replace them with other substances and thus make our own products better and more affordable,’ explains Thomas Kropf, head of corporate R&D at Bosch. Another example can be found in Alzheimer’s research. Detecting brain waves in the most granular way can help research the state of the brain, but to do that you need devices with magnets that are as fine and efficient as possible. It’s all still a long way off, but the ambitions are there. Bosch remains its sober self in this: very ambitious and focused, but without claiming that the recently announced collaboration already has ready-made solutions today. The reason for looking at quantum computers is that classical (super)computers are at their limits. But at the same time, Bosch also dampens expectations: It is research with concrete goals, but actual applications are still a long way off. “There are still big steps to be taken, but we want to step in now because the world is on the brink of major breakthroughs, and once there, quantum computers will change our lives in every way. Hopefully in our generation , but certainly in the next.” But isn’t Bosch just an IBM customer rather than a partner? The company strongly contradicts this. ‘IBM doesn’t do material simulations. We know how to do simulations and how to improve products based on those results, IBM knows how to build computers ,” Hartung explains to Data News. “It’s more than just being an IBM customer,” adds Kropf. ‘We are building a common ecosystem: we are programming a quantum computer in a different way, we are looking at hardware optimizations, how to go from code to compilation. All things that are still far from mature. »Bosch does not say how much money will go to the collaboration with IBM. But it emphasizes that it is not the main focus either. Kropf: ‘We especially want to bring together the best people from both companies to achieve something phenomenal. We will not just build ten quantum computers, but in the longer term we will build quantum sensors, for example.’ “It’s not just putting money on the table, others are already doing it,” adds Hartung delicately.

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