Emirates again flies twice a day to and from Brussels – Companies

From January, the Emirates airline will again fly as often between Brussels Airport and Dubai in the United Arab Emirates, just as it did before the corona pandemic.

“We are increasing the frequency to 14 flights a week, or two a day,” Jean-Pierre Martin, director of Emirates in Belgium, said on Thursday.

Even before the corona crisis broke out, Emirates flew twice a day from Brussels to Dubai and back. During the pandemic, all flights were stopped for a while, after which the frequency was gradually increased again. Since last winter, Emirates has operated twelve return flights per week on the Brussels route.

Occupancy rate

Although capacity and passenger numbers are not yet at 2019 levels, the airline’s revenue from the connection to and from Belgium has returned to pre-corona levels since July. This is due to more expensive tickets. “Rates have gone up significantly,” Martin said. “Fuel prices have led to higher fares for all airlines.”

Martin does not give specific passenger numbers, but he does say that the occupancy rate on the Brussels route is in the same order of magnitude as at group level, and it currently stands at 78 percent. The flights to and from Belgium take place with Boeing 777 aircraft, with space for 354 passengers. Emirates also operates cargo flights at Brussels Airport, to and from Dubai and the US city of Chicago.

Recruit

Emirates is looking for 450 pilots and 6,000 flight attendants at group level. For the second group, there are two recruitment events in Belgium in December: December 10 in Brussels and December 29 in Antwerp.

There are currently 235 Belgians working for the group.

Flight tax

Martin on Thursday expressed reservations about the flight tax introduced by the federal government in April, which costs €4 per passenger for Emirates flights.

“We are prepared to pay such a tax, but we are not sure how the proceeds will be used. What exactly does the government do with the money?’ Martin wondered.

Revenue and profit figures

The Emirates group has had a good summer. Record results were achieved in the first half of its broken financial year (April-September), as announced two weeks ago. Revenue amounted to 15.3 billion US dollars (14.7 billion euros), net profit amounted to 1.2 billion dollars.

“Demand was high, capacity was increased and corona restrictions have been lifted,” explained Martin. Emirates now offers 90 percent of pre-corona destinations again, and 74 percent of the number of seats.

New appliances

Emirates has ambitious plans. The company expects dozens of new aircraft from the summer of 2024. Meanwhile, starting this month, a total of 120 current aircraft will be completely renewed (including a new class: premium economy), an investment of 2 billion dollars.

The new class will not be immediately introduced on the Brussels route, Martin expects. After all, Emirates flies to and from Belgium with its latest 777s, while it is the older planes that are being renewed. Unless Emirates decides to send an Airbus A380, the largest airliner in the world, to Zaventem. A large part of it is also being renovated.

The director for Belgium did not rule that out. “I think there’s room for more” on the Brussels route, Martin said. “If there was a change, it would be an A380” rather than, say, a new Airbus A350 because it has fewer seats.

“We are increasing the frequency to 14 flights a week or two a day,” Jean-Pierre Martin, director of Emirates in Belgium, said on Thursday. Even before the corona crisis broke out, Emirates flew twice a day from Brussels to Dubai and back. During the pandemic, all flights were stopped for a while, after which the frequency was gradually increased again. Since last winter, Emirates has operated twelve return flights per week on the Brussels route. Although capacity and passenger numbers are not yet at 2019 levels, the airline’s revenue from the connection to and from Belgium has returned to pre-corona levels since July. This is due to more expensive tickets. “Rates have gone up significantly,” Martin said. “Fuel prices have led to higher fares for all airlines.” Martin does not give specific passenger numbers, but he does say that the occupancy rate on the Brussels route is in the same order of magnitude as at group level, and it currently stands at 78 percent. The flights to and from Belgium take place with Boeing 777 aircraft, with space for 354 passengers. Emirates also operates cargo flights at Brussels Airport, to and from Dubai and the US city of Chicago Emirates is looking for 450 pilots and 6,000 flight attendants at group level. For the second group, there are two recruitment events in Belgium in December: December 10 in Brussels and December 29 in Antwerp. There are currently 235 Belgians working for the group. Martin on Thursday expressed reservations about the flight tax introduced by the federal government in April, which costs €4 per passenger for Emirates flights. “We are prepared to pay such a tax, but we are not sure how the proceeds will be used. What exactly does the government do with the money?’ Martin wondered. The Emirates group has had a good summer. Record results were achieved in the first half of its broken financial year (April-September), as announced two weeks ago. Revenue amounted to 15.3 billion US dollars (14.7 billion euros), net profit amounted to 1.2 billion dollars. “Demand was high, capacity was increased and corona restrictions have been lifted,” explained Martin. Emirates now offers 90 percent of pre-corona destinations again, and 74 percent of the number of seats. Emirates has ambitious plans. The company expects dozens of new aircraft from the summer of 2024. Meanwhile, starting this month, a total of 120 current aircraft will be completely renewed (including a new class: premium economy), an investment of 2 billion dollars. The new class will not be immediately introduced on the Brussels route, Martin expects. After all, Emirates flies to and from Belgium with its latest 777s, while it is the older planes that are being renewed. Unless Emirates decides to send an Airbus A380, the largest airliner in the world, to Zaventem. A large part of it is also being renovated. The director for Belgium did not rule that out. “I think there’s room for more” on the Brussels route, Martin said. “If there was a change, it would be an A380” rather than, say, a new Airbus A350 because it has fewer seats.

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