A carbon-free world thanks to flying whales

There is more than poetry to this French-Quebec “flying whale” project. These serene XXL zeppelins, which could cross the sky as early as 2024, were supposed to replace polluting and noisy trucks, helicopters or planes to transport heavy loads.

Airships powered by helium (a non-flammable gas), designed by the French start-up Flying Whales, are not only an original cargo transport solution with a very low carbon footprint, but also serve to open up isolated areas and populations that are inaccessible by country road.

Such as the Inuit in the far north or communities affected by conflicts or natural disasters. The flying cargo ships can bring goods and food to areas where there are no roads, heliports or airports (anymore). In this sense, they are one of the tools of the seventeen Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) that the UN launched in 2020 to save the planet and humanity.

This zeppelin can carry up to 60 tons of material.

The project is co-financed by the French and Quebec governments and by the Chinese state-owned company Avic.

The name of the Zeppelin? LCA60T. It will be the first airship with hybrid propulsion: Four 1 MW turbines for energy production are combined with electric motors for the propellers. According to current plans, the airship will emit 20 times less particles per transported tons than a helicopter. Eventually, Flying Whales will use a hydrogen fuel cell to create a 100% carbon-free means of transport.

The LCA60T should be operational in 2024 and will have titanic dimensions: 154 meters long, 42 meters high and 60 meters wide. It surpasses the legendary LZ 129 Hindenburg (inflated with hydrogen and destroyed by fire in 1937).

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LZ 129 Hindenburg

© getty images

Antonov An-225 Mriya

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Antonov An-225 Mriya

© getty images

LCA60T

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LCA60T

©GF

LZ 129 Hindenburg

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LZ 129 Hindenburg

© getty images

Antonov An-225 Mriya

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Antonov An-225 Mriya

© getty images

LCA60T

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LCA60T

©GF

“The flying whale” will even be much larger than the Antonov An-225 Mriya cargo plane, which with its 84 meters long and 18 meters high is currently the largest and heaviest aircraft in the world.

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