Ryanair’s flight crew want to strike during the Christmas holidays – Companies

The flight attendants stationed in Belgium – the flight attendants and flight attendants – of the Irish low-cost airline Ryanair will strike for two consecutive weekends, including the New Year weekend. The Christian trade union has announced this. There will normally only be disturbances at Charleroi airport.

A first strike will take place on December 30 and 31 and January 1, the Flemish trade union center ACV Puls and the French-speaking CNE announced. The following weekend – Saturday 7 and Sunday 8 January – the cabin crew are also on strike. The unions are condemning the attitude of the Irish budget airline, which they say is still refusing to pay the legal minimum wage in Belgium.

Negotiations over a new collective agreement for Ryanair’s Belgium-based cabin crew have been at a standstill for months, with strikes already taking place over the summer. A month ago, the unions sent an open letter to the federal government to complain that Ryanair ‘continues to flout the law without anyone doing anything about it’. They had threatened to take action if things did not change by the end of the year. “Unfortunately, nothing has changed,” says Hans Elsen from ACV Puls. “On the contrary, the situation has even gotten worse.”

The strike will only affect Charleroi airport. Ryanair has fifteen aircraft based there. These are overnight units staffed by personnel based in Belgium. These planes are likely to remain on the ground during the strike, which would mean around half of Ryanair’s flights to and from Charleroi would have to be cancelled. The other half of the flights, with planes from foreign bases, could take place.

There would be no disruption at Brussels airport. Ryanair has not stationed any aircraft there since the end of October. It remains uncertain whether the Irish airline will open a base at Zaventem airport again this spring. The staff is still completely insecure, the unions condemn. According to them, however, Ryanair had promised clarity before Christmas.

CNE’s Didier Lebbe criticizes Ryanair’s policy of “temporarily and illegally seconding staff to other European bases, such as Dublin or London”. According to him, this practice has ‘even increased’ and the airline is trying to encourage its employees to resign themselves.

A first strike will take place on December 30 and 31 and January 1, the Flemish trade union center ACV Puls and the French-speaking CNE announced. The following weekend – Saturday 7 and Sunday 8 January – the cabin crew are also on strike. The unions are condemning the attitude of the Irish budget airline, which they say is still refusing to pay the legal minimum wage in Belgium. Negotiations over a new collective agreement for Ryanair’s Belgium-based cabin crew have been at a standstill for months, with strikes already taking place over the summer. A month ago, the unions sent an open letter to the federal government to complain that Ryanair ‘continues to flout the law without anyone doing anything about it’. They had threatened to take action if things did not change by the end of the year. “Unfortunately, nothing has changed,” says Hans Elsen from ACV Puls. “On the contrary, the situation has even gotten worse.” The strike will only affect the airport in Charleroi. Ryanair has fifteen aircraft based there. These are overnight units staffed by personnel based in Belgium. These planes are likely to remain on the ground during the strike, which would mean around half of Ryanair’s flights to and from Charleroi would have to be cancelled. The other half of the flights, with planes from foreign bases, could take place. There would be no disruption at Brussels airport. Ryanair has not stationed any aircraft there since the end of October. It remains uncertain whether the Irish airline will open a base at Zaventem airport again this spring. The staff is still completely insecure, the unions condemn. According to them, however, Ryanair had promised clarity before Christmas. CNE’s Didier Lebbe criticizes Ryanair’s policy of “temporarily and illegally seconding staff to other European bases, such as Dublin or London”. According to him, this practice has ‘even increased’ and the airline is trying to encourage its employees to resign themselves.

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